Fibroid Tumor Removal

Myringotomy - Insertion of Tube

A Fibroid Tumor – How To Avoid Hysterectomy

A fibroid tumor of the uterus, otherwise known as a myoma, is the most common reason that a woman visits her gynecologist in the ten years leading up to menopause and also one of the most common reasons for a woman in her thirties or forties, to be advised to have a hysterectomy. Fibroid tumors are round, non cancerous lumps of the muscular wall of the uterus, made up of smooth muscle and connective tissue and they normally occur in groups. They start off fairly small but can grow to the size of a grapefruit and are normally accompanied by heavy, painful and irregular periods.

A uterine fibroid tumor is caused by too much estrogen in the body which stimulates its growth whilst a lack of estrogen causes the fibroids to disappear. Many women in their mid thirties begin to experience non ovulating menstrual cycles and as they approach the decade before the menopause they are producing less progesterone than normal and possibly more estrogen. They retain water and salt, their breasts enlarge, they gain weight, become depressed , lose their sex drive, suffer mineral loss in their bones and they develop fibroids. All of these symptoms point to a dominance of estrogen. Conventional medicine would normally advise a woman at this stage to have a hysterectomy but it has been discovered that by balancing the hormones, naturally, fibroids can be prevented from growing and may even decrease in size and then, once menopause is reached, the fibroids will naturally disperse of their own accord.

So it is important for any pre menopausal woman who has fibroids to reduce her estrogen levels and to take a supplemental dose of progesterone. Taken regularly the progesterone will level out the hormone balance and prevent any fibroids from getting larger. An ultrasound after three months will hopefully show that the fibroids have either remained the same size or decreased. Other effective ways of slowing fibroid growth is by exercising, reducing stress levels and reducing calories. By adopting these methods there is every chance that that fibroids will not grow and cause problems and there will be no need for a hysterectomy to be carried out. If a woman can get her hormones balanced and her menstrual cycle in a regular pattern, then conditions such as uterine fibroid tumors and ovarian cysts, stand very little chance of occurring.

So many women are led to believe that medication and surgery are their only options when dealing with conditions such as fibroids and ovarian cysts, but trust me when I say that natural treatments can and do work.

About the author: You no longer have to live with the pain, bloated stomach and feeling of nausea that are all symptoms of a fibroid tumor.Instead you can learn the remedies you can implement yourself to successfully shrink the tumor and stop it from growing simply by visiting www.ovariancystremedies.info

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/womens-health-articles/a-fibroid-tumor-how-to-avoid-hysterectomy-1660861.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Do excessive fibroid tumors (and their surgical removal) affect a woman’s ability to conceive?

    • ANSWER:
      I heard that they can cause difficulty if they’re really big.
      check out this link:
      http://www.askmygyn.com/GYN-medical-health-answers-all.php?mainCatID=18&subCat=28&FAQ_GROUP_ID=39
      They do list fertility issues as a possible symtpom of fibroids. I don’t know about the removal question, but i would imagine that if you removed them, it makes sense that the problem should go away.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know if there is a treatment for a tumor in the fibroid while 13 weeks pregnant? ?
    Re: cervical growth. Is there a way to slow this growth down besides removal ?

    • ANSWER:
      It is extremely rare that uterine fibroid tumors are cancerous.. But during pregnancy, fibroid tumors often grow extremely fast due the extra estrogen produced by the body during pregnancy.The baby is rarely affected unless there is substantial bleeding or the myoma’s growth or separation causes placental abruption or tearing// removing the tumor AFTER the baby is born is the best way to do it.. if u have any other problems like bleeding and severe abdominal pain you should see your doctor right away!!!


  3. QUESTION:
    uterine Fibroid Removal?
    I had a large uterine fibroid removed on April 22. The fibroid was large 10.5 cm, so they did it by an incision cut (from my belly button down to the top of my vagina). The first week and 1/2 were painful, but now I’m up, walking around doing pretty normal activities. Went to my post-op visit, and the pathology was normal/benign (orig. they were worried it was cancer because the tumor grew so big so fast). But I’m ok, and the stitches had dissolved. The Dr. performed and internal exam and said everything looked fine and that for the next two to three months it’s normal to feel a little “off” down there.
    Well other than the scar healing and the skin being a bit bruised and tightened I was feeling fine. Now I constantly feel bloated. I feel like my colon is always filled with pressure and gas. I don’t know if this is what she means by “off” and it’s normal after major abdominal surgery or if I should call and make another appt?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a c-section and also a fibroid that they removed. It’s normal to feel like the doctor said “off” for a couple of months. Everything has to settle back to where it was. My doctor recommended that I get checked every 6-12 months to see if it grows back. Wait awhile before you go back unless your in deep pain. YOU JUST HAD SURGERY.

  4. QUESTION:
    Uterine Fibroid Removal?
    I had a large uterine fibroid removed on April 22. The fibroid was large 10.5 cm, so they did it by an incision cut (from my belly button down to the top of my vagina). The first week and 1/2 were painful, but now I’m up, walking around doing pretty normal activities. Went to my post-op visit, and the pathology was normal/benign (orig. they were worried it was cancer because the tumor grew so big so fast). But I’m ok, and the stitches had dissolved. The Dr. performed and internal exam and said everything looked fine and that for the next two to three months it’s normal to feel a little “off” down there.
    Well other than the scar healing and the skin being a bit bruised and tightened I was feeling fine. Now I constantly feel bloated. I feel like my colon is always filled with pressure and gas. I don’t know if this is what she means by “off” and it’s normal after major abdominal surgery or if I should call and make another appt?

    • ANSWER:
      There’s likely no connection between your fibroid removal operation and your present feelings of bloat. Try avoiding any carbonated drinks, like soda. Sometimes ice cream or other lactose items in the diet can produce bloat, in which case over-the-counter lactrase tablets taken with dairy foods can be of help. Also try avoiding any very spicy foods. You might also just be swallowing a lot of air. If this doesn’t work, see your surgeon again.

  5. QUESTION:
    When should you consider having fibroid tumors removed?
    My doc says I have two small ones. The pain is not that bad…when should you consider removal? Since they are harmless should I just ignore it?
    Just asking for general opinions from women who may have experience.

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are, as your doc may have told you, benign tumours of the uterine tissue. As such they, themselves are not a health threat but they do cause problems by their size as they grow.
      They are usually slow growing and the only danger they present is that sooner or later a large uterine artery will rupture and a large bleed will occur. It’s at this time you’ll most likely have to undergo a hysterectomy – removal of the uterus.
      You can have the hysterectomy now and get the fibroids out now and make it such a small operation as these tumors can grow to to the size of water melons. Or, you can wait until something more involved develops and the operation is larger and more complex.
      Depends on the size of the fibroids too. Small ones can mean a vaginal hysterectomy while large ones need an abdominal entry operation.



You May Also Like These Topics...

Fibroids In The Uterus Symptoms

Can Diet Help With Fibroids In The Uterus? What To Eat And Drink Fibroids in the uterus are very common and affect many women during childbearing years. This non-cancerous, solid tumor can grow in the womb. Many women ask, “can diet help with fibroids in the uterus?” and the answer is that it can, but […]

What Do Fibroids Look Like On An Ultrasound

Ovarian Cysts – What They Are And How They Affect You If you have experienced ovarian cysts at one time or another, they either went away on their own or they caused you significant pain and discomfort. In order to plan the best way of action, you need information on ovarian cysts – what they […]

Natural Cure For Fibroids

Natural Cures for fibroids – Natural Foods To Help Shrink and cure Fibroids Early detection of uterine fibroids is beneficial to cure women suffering from it simply because fibroids natural cure could be actually available right at their homes, and they can make use of these to prevent the progress of the condition. These natural cure will […]

Apple Cider Vinegar For Fibroids

Apple Cider Vinegar and fibroids Although natural apple cider vinegar and the cure for fibroids are thought to be related with each other, yet there is no scientific evidence that supports the improvement of fibroids, so we can not say it is a nature cure for the disease. It is just an urban myth. Also, we […]

Tags: , , ,
Previous Post

Cervical Fibroids Symptoms

Next Post

Uterine Fibriods

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.