Fibroids Cause Weight Gain

 ... (IUFD), commonly known as stillbirth, in women who have fibroids

Do Fibroids Make You Gain Weight?

If you are wondering “do fibroids make you gain weight” then the answer is that they can, but this doesn’t always happen. The amount of weight gain depends on a number of factors, including your genetic make-up, the severity of the fibroids and what you are doing to manage the symptoms.

Fibroids themselves can sometimes grow very large, and the fact that they are comprised of solid, muscular tissue, then their density means that large fibroids will inevitably carry some weight and this will show as an increase on the scales.

The largest fibroid ever recorded tipped the scale at a massive 140 pounds and although this is extreme, there are a number of cases where fibroids have grown as large as 50 pounds. However, although most will never reach sizes like this, it is not uncommon for fibroids to grow so large that they give the appearance of a 6 or 7 month pregnancy in slimmer women. Most fibroids though are so small that they are never detected or problematic, with many women never realising that they have them in the first place.

If you are wanting to know “do fibroids make you gain weight not just on the abdomen” then the answer is no. What does not happen is an overall increase in body fat, with any weight gain being attributable just to the fibroids themselves.

The good news is that fibroids will naturally shrink around the time of the menopause and this will cause the abdomen to shrink. However, if you are interested in trying a natural way to eliminate your fibroids now, there is much you can do if you are prepared to make a number of dietary and lifestyle changes.

Written by a former fibroid sufferer, the system you are about to see is, quite simply, groundbreaking, and I am confident that you will feel relief that you have finally found something that will genuinely help you get rid of your fibroids.

If you would like to see further information on how a natural treatment could be your best option and get answers to the question, “do fibroids make you gain weight”, please visit How To Get Rid Of Fibroids.

One of the best features of this comprehensive system is the 3 months free one-to-one email support offered by the author.

About the author: Gail advocates using natural treatments for fibroids rather than using conventional medication or surgery as this is a workable long term solution. Conventional medication only treats the symptoms and fibroids are likely to regrow, whereas natural treatments, when used properly can eliminate the root cause by rebalancing the body and restoring overall health.

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/womens-health-articles/do-fibroids-make-you-gain-weight-3333525.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can uterine fibroids cause weight gain?
    I have a follow up appt with my doctor on Friday to determine if he found uterine fibroids. I just wanted to know if weight gain is a side effect. I’ve noticed in the past year I have had some weight gain but I have not changed any part of my lifestyle including my diet. If anything I eat a little less and healthier. Does anyone know about this?

    • ANSWER:
      I think the fibroids in themselves can sometimes get quite large and heavy. It might also pay to get your ovaries investigated for Poly-cystic Ovary Syndrome, which can cause weight gain.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does fibroids cause pain and weight gain?

    • ANSWER:
      Have a look here:

  3. QUESTION:
    Hi. I am female and aged 28. In 2001 I was diagnosed as having fibroids. I am battling with my weight.?
    I have a very reasonable diet and go to the gym often. However, regardless of my effort I just seem to be gaining weight fast. In the past month alone i have put on about three kilos which is about 6 pounds. I have done some personal research and it appears that fibroids can cause weight gain. Can you help. My weight gain is really begining to upset me. Since 2003 I have been of the pill and now my period pain as well seems to be coming back. Any idea whats happening to me.

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to prevent or reduce the growth of fibroids?
    I understand that fibroids are common and once developed, it really doesn’t go away. But is there a way to prevent getting any more of them or having them grow larger? Is there a certain diet or lifestyle that can be contributed to them?

    I thought I read somewhere that although it is not a certain cause, fibroids seem to occur often in women who experience weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids develop from abnormal cell growth in the uterus (womb). The exact cause of these benign tumors is not known. However, both genetic and environmental conditions have been identified as contributing risk factors for fibroids. A number of factors may increase a woman’s likelihood of developing uterine fibroids. These include:

      Age. Although they can occur at any age after puberty, fibroids most frequently appear in women aged 30 to 40 years old. In addition, early age at menarche, especially before age 10, is considered a risk factor for the condition later in life.

      Genetics and heredity. Research indicates that many fibroids contain alterations in genes that code for uterine muscle cells. Women who have a mother or sister with fibroids appear to be at increased risk of developing them.

      Ethnicity. Fibroids tend to appear more frequently among black women than Caucasians. Also, black women tend to develop fibroids at younger ages, and also typically experience numerous and/or larger fibroids.

      Hormonal changes. Research indicates that the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence the growth of uterine fibroids. When a woman with uterine fibroids experiences hormonal changes during pregnancy, the fibroids typically enlarge. However, after childbirth the fibroids tend to shrink back to the original size. In addition, when women stop menstruating (menopause), uterine fibroids usually shrink or disappear altogether. Other studies indicate that hormones that help the body maintain tissues, such as the insulin-like growth factor, may also affect fibroid growth.

      High-fat diet and alcohol consumption. Significant consumption of red meats (e.g., beef, ham) and alcoholic beverages, especially beer, is associated with an increased risk of developing fibroids in the uterus.

      Obesity. Having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater appears to increase a woman’s risk of developing these benign tumors of the uterus.

      There’s really a lot of great information on fibroids – their prevention, treatment, signs and symptoms at the women’s site below. Take a look – I’m sure you’ll find it helpful!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/uterineovarianhealth/uterinefibroids.cfm

  5. QUESTION:
    Fitness goal…sound reasonable?
    I have been a long time sufferer of PCOS and uterine fibroid tumors.

    I enjoyed my childhood as a very skinny person…and then, I gained 80 lbs in 6 months and haven’t lost it since…that was almost 15 years ago.

    I have 2 sets of doctors on 2 sides of the fence.

    One set of doctors believe my weight gain was from the PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and fibroids…hormone imbalances in other words…and without getting treatment for them, I’ll never lose more than 20 lbs.

    The other set of doctors believe that I overate and the weight gain caused the PCOS and fibroids…which I tend to not believe because I only eat 1 or 2 meals a day…I’ve never been into eating like those that suffer from disorders…just when I get a tummy grumble…stop when I feel full.

    So, with this said, I plan to try to lose 30 pounds by June 30. IF I don’t, and give it my best shot, I will seek treatment for my fibroids and PCOS.

    Sound reasonable to you, or what should I do?
    I wanted to add that I would do this without “starving” myself, and would increase my exercise levels (even though I am fat, I do play basketball and soccer with my children, etc…I’m hardly “inactive”).

    I just think that if I end up not losing over 20 lbs with a big effort on my part, that it would tend to suggest something more than overeating, wouldn’t you think?

    I can’t imagine anyone eating so much they could GAIN 80 lbs in 6 months and still be in taekwon-do and softball and a bowler (the things I was doing when I gained the weight).

    Thanks for listening, if anything.
    Letswatch…it appears you have your questions blocked, so allow me to explain in regards to my other post.

    Your post had the huge undertone of anger/hatred…and though I do agree with the message you were saying somewhat…I guess I am just saying your delivery was off.

    I meant no offense, and I am saddened that you would post here and then “hide” when we could have had a mature dialogue, even if we didn’t have a complete “meeting of the minds” so to speak.

    I know more than you think about that subject…I have 2 children that came to us through adoption…so it’s a pity we both couldn’t learn from each other.

    • ANSWER:
      no it doesnt sound unreasonable…i think its a very good goal to try to do something about it on your own instead of just jumping to a “miracle cure” like a lot of people do
      congratulations!!!! and i wish you the best


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