Fibroids And Gas

Locations of fibroids:

Constipation and Gas – the Link Between Flatulence and Being Constipated

Constipation and gas have a definite connection. Constipation causes the person’s stool to be hard, making it a challenge to pass. This can cause hemorrhoids and anal fissures, which can bring pain. The person experiences cramps and bowel sounds and flatulence, or gas.

There are different signs of constipation, including bowel movements that are infrequent at three times or less in a week, difficulty during a bowel movement due to the hard stools and the inability to complete the defecation.

Flatulence comes hand-in-hand with constipation. This gas happens when there is pressure through the anus, and this pressure exceeds the sphincter’s ability to handle it. Flatulence can be present when feces are found in the rectum, so if a person is constipated, they are more likely to suffer from gas. The flatulence is more likely to have a foul odor when there is feces, or any bacteria present.

If the gas builds up, it can become painful for the individual and constipation is more likely to occur if flatulence is held inside.

A person can be constipated even if they experienced bowel movements on a daily basis. There are two types of stools on the Bristol Stool Chart that identify constipation. The first can be described as small lumps, similar to nuts, which are hard to pass. The second stool is sausage shaped but lumpy.

There is a type of constipation that is considered the most severe- obstipation. This is when the constipation becomes so bad that both feces and gas are prevented from passing.

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Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/constipation-and-gas-the-link-between-flatulence-and-being-constipated-405641.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Abdominal fullness, fluttering and cramping and sore veiny breasts?
    Can anyone help me? 4-8DPO – Had fullness in my uterus – suddenly very ‘aware’ of my uteus. Not painful but felt like it was pressing on my bladder. 9-13DPO – Fluttering feelings in stomach and mild pinching. Fluttering goes away when I stand up. Pinching in my belly button. 9-13DPO – sore breasts. They first felt tingly but now are quite sore. Get sudden pains down them. Very prominent blue veins leading into nipples but now I am getting prominent veins all over (never seen this before). 7-13DPO – period cramping with heaps of cervical mucus but no sign of period.

    I am currently 13DPO. Fairly sure I’m not pregnant – several disappointing negative tests. Even my doctor is confused. He said it is not uterine fibroids, gas or constipation. Any ideas??? He said it could just be hormonal. Going back on Monday for bloods and urine. Anyone experienced anything like this? Thanks so much – quietly going insane.

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely all of the symptoms of early pregnancy are exactly the same as those you can get just before your period.

      When you are trying to conceive it’s very easy to try and attribute every little oddness to pregnancy, as you’ve never really noticed them before, when it’s just probably the fact that you are paying such very close attention to everything you’re feeling down there.

      Your body doesn’t know that it is pregnant until a fertilised egg has implanted in the wall of the uterus and begun releasing pregnancy hormones, and that can happen anywhere between 6 and 14 days past ovulation.

      I start getting cramping the day I ovulate and it tends to continue off an on until a few days into my period. My breasts get sore during ovulation and stay sore until my period.

      There really is no point taking a pregnancy test until your period is actually late – implantation can take up to 14 days, which is usually when your period would start, and it takes several days after implantation for the HCG levels to build enough to be picked up by the tests.

      The tests that say they work even before your period, only work if implantation happened at the early end of the range.

      The ideal time to test is at 18DPO.

  2. QUESTION:
    Fullness in uterus, fluttering and cramping in abdomen, and sore veiny breasts?
    Can anyone help me? 4-8DPO – Had fullness in my uterus – suddenly very ‘aware’ of my uteus. Not painful but felt like it was pressing on my bladder. 9-13DPO – Fluttering feelings in stomach and mild pinching. Fluttering goes away when I stand up. Pinching in my belly button. 9-13DPO – sore breasts. They first felt tingly but now are quite sore. Get sudden pains down them. Very prominent blue veins leading into nipples but now I am getting prominent veins all over (never seen this before). 7-13DPO – period cramping with heaps of cervical mucus but no sign of period.

    I am currently 13DPO. Fairly sure I’m not pregnant – several disappointing negative tests. Even my doctor is confused. He said it is not uterine fibroids, gas or constipation. Any ideas??? He said it could just be hormonal. Going back on Monday for bloods and urine. Anyone experienced anything like this? Thanks so much – quietly going insane.

    • ANSWER:
      That I did while pregnant. You are more than likely pregnant and the hcg hasn’t showed up quite yet. Best of luck to you! xxx

  3. QUESTION:
    Do they put you to sleep for a Laparoscopy? Do I need someone to drive me home after? Is it true about gas?
    Is it true you have really bad gas afterwards? Do you fart during surgery? lol. Do you stay in the hospital overnight or go home? Does it take long? How many days are you in pain afterwards? I have:
    cysts on my ovaries
    fibroids on my uterus
    pre cancerous cells on my cervix
    and one of these three (uterine cancer, endometriosis, polycystic ovarian syndrome).

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you are asleep for the laproscopy. They normally use an intravenous anesthetic because you don’t need to be asleep for that long. All laproscopic procedures require them to use gas to inflate your abdomen so the surgeon can see what is going on, and have room to work. You may well pass gas during the procedure, it’s kind of understood that you are asleep and medical people don’t pay much mind to natural body functions. You will wake up feeling bloated, like your own personal balloon. Yes, it passes the way gas normally passes. The more you move around, the faster it goes away, but there is usually a day or so of surprise outbursts. How long you are kept after you wake up depends on where you have the surgery done and the doctor. It can be done as a day surgery, if done early in the morning you might be able to go home in the early evening. You could also need to stay in longer if the surgery is needed to be more invasive. If they do a hysterectomy, you will be in about a week most often. You should not be in a lot of pain, if all that is done is a laproscopy repair. You will wake up with about 3-4 poke holes, each closed with either staples or sutures, only a couple per poke hole. You may not feel like running marathons, but should not be in a lot of pain. Mostly misery from the gas bloating. You will be offered pain medications to help with that, as needed. Once you return to your room from recovery, the nurses will be encouraging you to get up and walk a little, and to go to the bathroom under your own steam. I suggest you force yourself up out of the bed no matter what. The sooner you are on your feet, the sooner you feel better and the sooner the gas passes. If you lay there like a lump in the bed, only moving when you absolutely must, you can be miserable for days. If you get up quickly enough, you will still have some of the anesthetic and pain killers left over from the surgery, so won’t feel nearly so much to begin with. Don’t get worked up and worried ahead of time either, dreading what hasn’t happened yet. If you go in keyed up, you have a hard time when you wake up and may wake up crying and combative. You won’t be in agony, no matter what. And hopefully when you wake up, you will hear good news, that it’s all been taken care of and your worries are gone. Good luck, and don’t worry so much. It will all work out.

  4. QUESTION:
    Why is my stomach so bloated? IBS? Fibroids? No pain…?
    After my second child my tummy did not go away. There is a two year gap between my second and third child so I continued to remain fat…even after the third.

    It has been a significant amount of time since my last child but I continue to look like I am 6 months pregnant. I am really only fat in the tummy. I am not taking any medicines.

    I believe that I have been misdiagnosed…Dr. says “gas”…Is there a cleanser for your intestines that I can take? Not a laxitive there is a difference.

    And what ever happend to worms…wasn’t there a time not too long ago when people use to get worms…why is that?…and why is it that this is “no longer the case?” Could I have some sort of a parasite living inside of me and eating away at my insides?

    • ANSWER:
      Bloated stomach and gas can be associated with wheat/gluten allergy /intolerance, or some other allergies
      People can and do still get worms but if is more rare now than years ago due to better hygiene and less association with animals
      Have you been checked for cysts or womb or ovary infection
      You could try and detox to clean the intestines
      See a specialist if not happy with doctors diagnosis

  5. QUESTION:
    I had a weird feeling in my uterus?
    I had a weird feeling in my uterus that lasted for a few seconds. It happened like 3 times or so. It felt like…a poking feeling from my uterus, or just some weird pressure that didn’t hurt at all…it just felt weird! It went away after a few seconds (and after a burp). I never had this feeling before, but I was thinking either a bunch of gas or even fibroids. I’m 19 years old, so what’s going on?
    I only felt a weird pressure (not painful at all), and I felt it on the right side. So it could have been near my ovary/tube on that side.
    It was also the last day of my period today, but I’m not sure if this would help. Just wanted to put out more facts.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you sure you know it’s your uterus? Your uterus is not large when your not pregnant, and I think it’s something else.



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