Fibroid Disease

Smith & Nephew | Uterine Polyp and Fibroid Disease

Symptoms Of Fibroid Tumors

Fibroids are actually non-cancerous tumors that develop on the inside or outside of the uterus. The cause of fibroid tumors is still a mystery to everyone. But according to studies, estrogen is the main contributor in the development of fibroids. Some physicians note that these tumors are formed once the body reacts to the abnormal level of estrogen. However there are also experts that would contest this belief. Fibroids usually grow during pregnancy and when taking birth control pills since there extra production of the estrogen hormone. Fibroids are also believed to develop when taking estrogen supplements. But the tumor reduces in size the moment a woman reaches the menopause stage. This stage happens when the body stops releasing estrogen.

Around 80% of North American women are victims of fibroid tumors while 40% of Asian women can also be affected. One will determine the presence of a fibroid tumor if you experience the following symptoms – lower abdominal pain and irritation in the bladder part is felt when there is a formation of fibroid. Women can feel sporadic pain while some can experience constant pain. Pain during sexual intercourse can also occur once the tumor is developed near the vagina.

Aside from pain, one can also experience a pressure on the lower abdomen or bladder. Tumors prompt you to urinate often and this is the main reason why the pressure is felt. Some may feel the urge to urinate before you normally expect while others can no longer urinate. Menstrual cycle is also prevalent if you are dealing with fibroid tumors. Expect to have heavy and painful bleeding and women who have this kind of tumor have menstruation that lasts or 8 days or even longer.

Other symptoms of fibroid tumors also include significant weight gain, depression, and mood swings, infertility, and a whole lot more.

Fibroid tumors are also the main reason why women with the age bracket of 30 or 40 have hysterectomies. But not all fibroid victims are courageous enough to seek the help of a doctor. Though only 1% of fibroid tumors are malignant, one should still be vigilant in curing this health problem. Your doctor will advise you to undergo hysterectomy once fibroid tumor is detected. However, this procedure will only be carried out if you have heavy bleeding.

As a member of the female population, it is your responsibility to arm yourself with the right information about fibroid tumor. Anyone can become a victim so it is only right that you are well prepared.

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Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/womens-health-articles/symptoms-of-fibroid-tumors-2993133.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is Fibroid Lung Disease?
    My grandma has been in and out of the hospital for about a month or so due to not being able to breathe well. Today she had a biopsy of her lungs and say that she has Fibroid Lung Disease. Ive been looking on the internet for answers but cant find much. Someone please help.

    • ANSWER:
      fibroid -growth of tissue- in the lungs. your grandpa will have specific info about his diagnosis. call & ask him rather than guessing by junk you read online. go to his next pulmonologist’s appointment with him & have your questions answered. call the local American Lung Association for more info.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can having a fibroid tumor limit my chances of getting a scholarship to teach and study overseas?
    I want to teach English in S.Korea, and the application asks if I have a disease. I have a fibroid tumor and I was wondering if putting this on the application could limit my chances of getting accepted? Do you think it would be okay if I didn’t put it on there?

    • ANSWER:
      No.
      Having a Fibroid Tumor? Is not classified as a disease.

  3. QUESTION:
    How do doctors diagnose fibrocystic breast disease?
    Last couple months I have been getting horrible breast pain on and off. I do have several lumps in both breast’s and they seem to act up before my period.
    My mom seems to think it could me fibroid’s in my breasts. I am only sixteen and the thought of my doctor ” feeling me up ” is SCARY.

    So, I was just wondering how doctors would diagnose me etc etc
    hellp :(

    • ANSWER:
      Michaela – “Fibrocystic breast disease”, an old term, is now called “fibrocystic changes in the breast.” It is very common in women from the time of puberty on through the years. Fibroids form in the uterus, NOT in the breast where a single similar lump sometimes found in the teens is known as a fibroadenoma (a benign growth). Doctors do examine hundreds of breast each years, commonly while a female attendant (maybe even your mom) is present in the room. Maybe you would feel more at ease if you find a woman MD to examine you? First there is a family history taken since cystic changes often run in families. Then your personal breast history is talked about, like when during your monthly cycle do you get your most swelling. It’s best to get examined when you can most easily feel the largest lumps. Sometimes the doctor could easily locate a large lump, stick a tiny needle in the cyst and suck out fluid. If the fluid is clear, then a benign diagnosis is almost 100 percent certain. Now get over your anxiety of an exam and go get some relief from a doctor’s visit.

  4. QUESTION:
    anemia for two years give me heart disease?
    I also had a haemoglobin of 97 and now im supposedly fine as i had a fibroid removed

    • ANSWER:
      Is your question “can anemia for two years cause heart disease?”

      If so,.. yes.

      Generally it must be quite moderate to severe anemia to do so,.. but yes, it does happen. Why? Well in anemia you lose the oxygen supply due to the binding abilities in the haemoglobin in the blood. Thus with your ability to carry oxygen in proper quantity around the body the body has to compensate to supply this oxygen. The body will compensate by increasing the cardiac output .. in other words causing the heart to beat faster, with more contractile force. This compensatory effect of making the heart work harder .. over time .. can lead to heart problems long term. The heart muscles can hypertrophy (become larger) — and thicken — arrhythmia’s can develop (irregular beat), and so on.

      A cardiologist should be consulted and you should be monitored regularly on the condition of your heart as it is now prone to complications. This doesn’t mean you have to live life differently, or will have absolute problems anytime soon — just that you need to be careful and keep an eye on it, professionally. We cannot function without constant circulation of the blood,.. so you have to ensure your heart health is optimal regardless of condition.

      I’m glad to hear the anemia is resolved.. the damage would be much worse the longer you went without treatment.

      Lastly — If you are simply asking if it can ‘happen’ then yes.. if you haven’t been diagnosed with heart problems — then I would *not* worry about your heart. While it can cause problems, it doesn’t have to. I am unclear about your specific condition.

  5. QUESTION:
    i want to know if someone with fibroid can stillgive birth even at the age of 35-40?
    lets say she’s had the disease for a long time.

    • ANSWER:
      Although not medically trained, my understanding is that fibroids can make getting pregnant difficult due to the possibility of ovaries being blocked, ovarian tubes being blocked, the lining of the womb being thicker and therefore more difficult for an egg to embed and develop …..
      But I also believe fibroids can threaten a pregnancy because of their feeding from the same blood supply/circulation that a growing foetus would, that they could ‘cramp’ the ‘growing space’ for a foetus, that they can spread to and attach themselves to the embryonic sack itself, can cause problems with birthing itself ….
      As I said, not being medically trained myself I cannot absolutely vouch for this information, where a specialist would be able to ….
      but would suggest that if not already pregnant, take precautions to prevent pregnancy until you have got verified information. If however you are already pregnant, then I would seek qualified medical assurance and assistance and support for the duration of the pregnancy to protect the developing, and later, unborn child. I don’t believe your age will make a difference, anymore than it would under ‘normal’ circumstances. We all know there is less chance of pregnancy, and more chance of deformities, in older pregnancies and so this combined with fibroids could have the effect of preventing pregnancy in the first place.
      I repeat – your best bet is to consult someone who really does know – a gynaecologist.
      Either way I wish you well, and good luck


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