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Aug 27

Bleeding After Menopause Fibroids

Fibroids – Causes ...

Fibroid Symptoms After Menopause

Do you know about your own body ? And how many do you know? Following me please, women friends. There are uterine fibriods whose growth are affected by the hormones and estrogen on our uterine walls. Most women suffer from them, but they are unware of that. Unfortunately, they are more common as thay age. Though they are benign tumors, they can trigger many discomfort.Stop Fibroid Method Click here

Pain and heavy menstruation is one of the apparent results. About 33% women are affected to blood loss as well as anemia. Freguent need to urinate is another symptom. Large fibriods which give a press on the bladder to reduce its capacity make you have a feeling to urinate more and more often. And with the utrine fibriods are bloating, they can make women looks pregnant. What a horrible thing for the women who want to be slim! If you have a fibroid near the cervix, you will suffer pain while having sex. Most severely, there are many difficulties for you to have children if you have the fibriods within the wall of the uterus. Certainly, there are many other discomfort such as bleeding in between periods, digestive complaints, pelvic pain and so on.

Of course, there are many corresponding ways to deal with the fibriods problem. If you want to none of your own children any more, you will choose the surgery to have a hysterectomy and the fibriods can’t affect you for ever. Another surgery is to have a fibriod embolization and this kind of ways can also make you conceive difficultly. Well, you had better think about some natural cures. Most importantly, you should avoid taking birth control pills and choose a proper weight loss plan. Otherwise, there are many diet changes to help you to control the fibriods. Keep yourself from eating red meat , white bread, flour and so on. Keep yourself from agricultural fertilizers, pesticides, soft plastics and so on. If possible, you had better quit milk. And the organic or goat milk maybe the best choice for you. Besides above ways, a unique, 7 steps plan which are developed by an alternative practitioner is a useful tactic. It has been proved by many thousands of women worldwide and play an important role in the healing. Are you interested in having a try now? Stop Fibroid Secrets Click here

Make effort to stop fibriods. Please pay more attention to your health and treat yourself well. Grab A Copy Click here

About the author: Stop Fibroid Complaints

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/fibroid-symptoms-after-menopause-2060398.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Do polyps or fibroids bleed after the menopause, I noticed some blood on the tissue after I had a wee.Help
    please I am so scared, had my smear test done two weeks ago, not had the result yet.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids tend to regress at the menopause. Polyps can be traumatised and bleed. I am afraid however that you really have to wait for your results.

  2. QUESTION:
    Bleeding/Period nearly 5 years after menopause. Abnormal?
    My mother has just started bleeding after not having had a period for nearly 5 years. She had irregular bleeding (peri menopause) for two or three years then had her last period in December 2003. She is 57 years old. Yesterday, she started having what looks like an ordinary period. It is not spotting, its quite heavy, the way her periods were before menopause. She also says she had pre-menstrual symptoms like swollen breasts and bloating for a few days before the bleed started.

    She thinks it is normal and says it is because she has been taking evening primrose capsules lately.

    I don’t think its normal at all and I’m quite worried. She has never had fibroids, but both her older sisters have them, and she hasn’t really had a proper gynaecological (sp?) exam in years; not since her periods stopped. I think she should go to the doctor but she’s hearing none of it.

    Have any of you had a similar experience? Should I be worried? Any advice appreciated, I’m really worried!

    • ANSWER:
      Here is an easy and important answer to a long question. ALL post-menopausal bleeding MUST be investigated to exclude serious causes including tumours. The sooner she sees her GP and has a smear, examination and possibly referral the better.

  3. QUESTION:
    Sudden profuse bleeding after intercourse.?
    After three years of abstinence,I had passionate sex with my husband(he had been working abroad).After consumation of the act,I started bleeding profusely ,with big clots.After medication from the hospital bleeding stopped .Scan result shows multiple fibroids not more than one cms.Will the same situation repeat if I perform sex again?Why did the bleeding occur?I am 44 years old.Does this have anything to do with menopause?What precautions should I take in future to avoid reccurence of the same?

    • ANSWER:
      The first thing is after a long gap you had sex and this causes to bleed because the muscles get contracted. The second one is you are going through menopause shortly. Dont be rough when doing sex.

      Take a look at the Natural Cures, you can prolong your menopause occurence.

      The menopause or a woman’s change of life is a perfectly normal event which occurs in the mid or late forties. It signifies the end of the female reproductive period of life which commenced at adolescence in the early teens. There are several misconceptions about menopause. Many women at this time feel that they are growing old and that they are well past their full physical vigor. Other women feel that the menopause brings a cessation of sexual pleasure. These apprehensions are far from true. Menopause may be considered an end to women’s fertility but certainly not to her virility. It does not decrease a woman’s physical capacity or sexual vigor or enjoyment.

      Symptoms: During the menopause, the entire chain of endocrine glands is disturbed, particularly the gonads, thyroid and pituitary. In a really healthy woman, the menopausal change takes place without any unpleasant symptoms. The only sign that the “change” taking place is the cessation of menstrual flow. There are, however, many women who do not enjoy good health due to dietetic errors and a faulty style of living. In these cases, the menopausal change often leads to all kinds of distressing physical, emotional, and nervous symptoms and manifestations. Hot flashes, night sweats, nervous tension, menstrual disturbances, insomnia, diminished interest in sex, irritability, and depression are the typical symptoms of menopause. Other symptoms are chilly feelings, fatigue, palpitation, dizziness, headaches and numbness. Not every women will get these severe reactions. The severity or otherwise of the symptoms depend on a variety of factors such as general health, previous surgery and radiation. Menopause and its problems are usually over when menstruation stops.

      Causes: The annoying symptoms associated with menopause arise from the fact that the ovaries are no longer producing their normal amount of estrogen, the dominant female hormone. Anything which interferes with the normal functioning of the ovaries may also bring about these symptoms. The same strange feelings may occur if the ovaries are removed by surgery because of disease. This can also result from heavy X-ray therapy or the use of radiation. A lack of normal hormone balance may also result in a severe backache. This is caused by thinning of the bones arising from the low level of estrogen in the bloodstream. Unless properly treated, this may eventually lead to a collapse of one or more of the vertebrae.

      Treatment: Although menopause cannot be avoided, it can be postponed for as long as 10 to 15 years and it can be made a smooth affair when it comes, with a proper nutritional programme, special supplements and the right mental attitude. When a woman is affected by the menopausal change to any marked extent, it is a sure sign that her body is in a toxic condition and in need of a thorough cleansing. For this purpose, she should undergo a course of natural health building treatment. Diet is of utmost importance in such a scheme of treatment. In fact the problems at menopause are often much more severe than that at puberty largely because the diet has been deficient for many years prior to its onset, in many nutrients such as protein, calcium, magnesium, vitamins D, E, and pantothenic acid. The diet should be made up from three basic food groups, namely (i) seeds, nuts, and grains (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits. The emphasis should be on vitamin E-rich raw and sprouted seeds and nuts, unpasteurised high quality milk and homemade cottage cheese and an abundance of raw, organically grown fruits and vegetables. Plenty of freshly made juices of fruits and vegetables in season should also be included in this diet.

      All processed, refined and denatured foods, such as white sugar, white flour and all articles made with them, should be completely eliminated. Take special supplements such as vitamins C, B6 and pantothenic acid, which have a specific property of stimulating the body’s own production of estrogen or enhancing the effect of the existing estrogen. During menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can result in a severe calcium deficiency. For this reason, a larger than usual intake of calcium may help greatly. Vitamins D and F are also essential for assimilation of calcium. Any woman having difficulty at this time should supplement her daily diet with 1,000 units of natural vitamin D, 5000 milligrams of magnesium and two grams of calcium daily, which can be supplied by one quart of milk. During the menopause, the need for vitamin E soars 10 to 50 times over that previously required. Hot flashes, night sweats, and other symptoms of menopause often disappear when 50 to 100 units of vitamin E are taken daily. The symptoms recur quickly if the vitamin is discontinued.

      Of late, it has become popular to take estrogen to prevent or postpone menopausal symptoms. Although hormone therapy is apparently successful and will, in many cases, help the patient to feel and act younger, it cannot be recommended in all cases because of its carcinogenic effect. If, however, estrogen therapy is undertaken, it should never be administered at the same time as vitamin E therapy. Ingestion of estrogen and vitamin E should be separated by several hours. Beet juice has been found very useful in menopausal disorders. It should be taken in small quantities of 60 to 90 ml at a time thrice a day. It has proved much more permanently helpful than the degenerative effects of drugs or synthetic hormones. Carrot seeds have also been found valuable in menopausal tension. A teaspoonful of the seeds should be boiled in a glassful of cow’s milk for about 10 minutes and taken daily as a medicine in this condition.

      Plenty of outdoor exercise, such as walking, jogging, swimming, horse riding, or cycling, is imperative to postpone menopause. Other helpful measures in this direction are avoiding mental and emotional stress and worries, especially worry about growing old, sufficient sleep, and relaxation and following all general rules of maintaining a high level of health. The healthier a woman is, the fewer menopausal symptoms she will experience.

      The menopause can be made a pleasant affair by building bodily health and a sane mental outlook. From puberty to menopause, a woman has been somewhat of a slave to her female glands. At specified intervals she was inconvenienced by her menstrual periods. She bore children, enduring the pain and discomfort of pregnancy. Menopause relieves her of this bondage to her femininity. She can now experience some of the happiest days of a woman’s life. A whole new life is given to her, if she is wise enough to prepare for it and accept it as such.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    menstruation again after menopausal period?
    My mother has just started bleeding after not having had a period for nearly 5 years. She had irregular bleeding (peri menopause) for two or three years then had her last period in December 2003. She is 57 years old. Yesterday, she started having what looks like an ordinary period. It is not spotting, its quite heavy, the way her periods were before menopause. She also says she had pre-menstrual symptoms like swollen breasts and bloating for a few days before the bleed started.

    She thinks it is normal and says it is because she has been taking evening primrose capsules lately.

    I don’t think its normal at all and I’m quite worried. She has never had fibroids, but both her older sisters have them, and she hasn’t really had a proper gynaecological (sp?) exam in years; not since her periods stopped. I think she should go to the doctor but she’s hearing none of it.

    Have any of you had a similar experience? Should I be worried? Any advice appreciated, I’m really worried!

    • ANSWER:
      You know what to do. Take her to the doctor as soon as possible. Check the link out.

  5. QUESTION:
    Should I be upset with my Doc about how she handled my iron results?
    I am a 41 yr.old woman. I only go to the doc when I really need to…i have a Mum who is a hypocondriac so I tend to do the opposite. I have felt off for several years and always blamed my crazy periods – have cysts, fibroids and endometriosis. Within the past year I thought I was in a severe depression – tired all the time. The doc prescribed antidepressent and told me that my constant heart palpatations were just early menopause. She never requested bloodwork. I finally asked for blood work when I could not keep any thoughts in my head and thought I must be close to a breakdown and my palpatations were leaving me breathless. I had the blood work on a Thurs. afternoon. Doc called on Monday and said that my iron should be between 65-165 and mine was a 7. She did say I was severly anemic but did not seem overly concerned. She asked me to go out that day and get Palafer 325mg from the Pharmacist and take that for 3 months. She said I could stop taking the iron after 3 months and I didn’t need to have my bloodwork done again unless I still felt tired. Now, 2 months later, she has put me on Micronor to try to regulate the bleeding but does not think that anymore bloodwork is required. I should mention she is a new doc in her first year of practice. I never questioned her diagnosis until this weekend when a friend-of-a-friend, who is also a doctor, said that I should have immediately been given a blood transfusion and she was surprised that i had not had a heart attack at that number and said that I should be having regular bloodwork to see if the number is coming up. I am freaking out. I am calling today and asking for more blood work – i have been on the iron supplement for 2 months now. What else should I do???

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds to me as if Your Doctor is not taking your concerns seriously and The fact that she is new should have nothing to do with how she treats her patients. I am also anemic and have suffered from the condition on and off sense birth. I take iron medication three times a day and have regular blood work done every 3 months, unless I have symptoms. then My doctor will order blood work immediately to check my levels…If You feel that she is not treating your condition seriously, I would advise that you find a new doctor. And from the way you described the incadent, Then the sooner, The better for your health.


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